My New Life with Texas BBQ (or:) Why My Pants Are A Little Tighter Now

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My new city is filled to the brim with food and (luckily) almost all I’ve had so far is crazy good. Most of it rides the perfect, delicate line that traverses the worlds of creativity and tradition. And fried stuff. Lots of fried stuff.

Such as fried deviled eggs.

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 Or, fried rocky mountain oysters. (AKA calf fries). (If you don’t know what those are, look it up. And I’ll let you know ahead of time, they’re actually super delicious and surprisingly very common here.)IMG_1491

One of the many other glorious Austin foods that mixes traditions to create its own tradition: the breakfast taco:

IMG_1579Although every taco shanty has it’s own twist on the ubiquitous breakfast taco, the standard base is what you’d expect – a traditional Mexican tortilla filled with traditional American breakfast items: eggs, cheese, potatoes. Sometimes bacon, chorizo – or my favorite, last night’s left over brisket chopped into taco sized bits. Sometimes even sausage. You’re free to hold the potatoes, hold the meat, hold the cheese or add a few extra toppings. Anything you desire, just don’t hold the chiles – lest you be shunned from Texas forever. IMG_1580

Now for the big one: Central Texas Barbeque.

Article after article, book after book, guide after guide have all been written about Texas BBQ. And for a good reason – it’s awesome and there’s a lot of it. Plenty of instructions and guidelines to BBQ etiquette abound and I have tried to follow them, but it seems that just as everyone has their own idea of how to smoke the best brisket, so do they have their own ideas of how to eat it.

Some places go by hard and stringent Texas tradition of no sauce, not even hot sauce. No forks. No plates. (ok, maybe a little hot sauce….just a little.)IMG_1720IMG_1569Kreuz Market has been around since 1900, so their sign says. It’s a brother-sister turned in-law rivalry with Smitty’s Market just down the street. One does the long cooked, low and slow brisket and the other does the quick (still 6-8 hours) higher heat. The ultimate in BBQ debate.

No matter the preference for smoking length, the smokers are beautiful, with brick walls and doors covered in a century of black smoke.IMG_1721Other places, such as Blacks, are just as old, just as family owned, and a little more lenient on the rules: sauce OK served on the side at the table, a few more options for your meat-and-three style plate.

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A few standards always prevail, though: pickles and onions on the side, potato salad, cole slaw, and sliced bread. IMG_1608

And, eating with your hands.IMG_1546

In the end, the only proper etiquette you really need is to enjoy it!

You can follow Kitchen Eclectic and my journey through the world of Texas food on instagram: @kitcheneclectic

*Visit the historic Blacks BBQ, Kreuz Market and Smitty’s Market in Lockhart, Texas. Go as early as possible to get the best cuts, and to give yourself time to digest before the next plate of meat.